The World’s Top 20 Most Dangerous Male Jobs – SEE DETAILS

The World's Top 20 Most Dangerous Male Jobs - SEE DETAILS

The World’s Top 20 Most Dangerous Male Jobs – SEE DETAILS #world #top #most #dangerous #male #jobs

Have you ever wondered why girls gravitate toward firefighters, rock climbers, and bandits?

Women’s attraction to risky men has long been documented. Furthermore, they are regarded as lovers rather than husbands: shopkeepers, auditors, and programmers have always done a better job of providing a stable foundation for raising children. Another is the instinctive desire to possess a hero’s genes.

This is a topic related to natural selection. Roman women loved to make love to newly victorious gladiators; in the 20th century, the most beautiful girls went to racers (motorsport was much more dangerous than now). And even today, little has changed: climbers, stunt performers, and test pilots are much more likely to get fast and passionate female caresses. We’re not recommending you change your career, but you’ll probably figure out how to use this information. After all, girls are not shy about using retouched photos beyond recognition in dating apps.

Most dangerous male jobs ever

Most of his points are unromantic. We used statistics, but we believe that, in general, the situations are similar. Now you know where it is hardly worth hiring.

So, the list of dangerous professions in reverse order makes it more interesting.

20. Policemen. Every year, 14 people are killed for every 100,000 people. Surprisingly, the first from the end. Human and animal violence-related deaths are expected.

19. Mechanics for the repair of industrial equipment. 14 deaths per 100,000 people per year. Large equipment has a complex character: people die not when colliding with it but because of close contact with its details.

18. Cleaners of park areas. 14 deaths per 100,000 people per year. People of this profession, among other things, are responsible for the cleanliness of the roadsides and often fall under the wheels, just walking from the workplace along the road.

17. Inspectors of technical supervision service. 15 deaths per 100,000 people. It would seem that such a peaceful profession – people just check the compliance of structures and devices with regulations. Alas, the most common cause of death for technical supervision inspectors is people or animals.

16. Stonemasons. 17 deaths per 100,000 people. The usual cause of death is a fall. Please note: the list of dangerous construction professions is not limited to masons.

15. Road workers. 18 deaths per 100,000 people per year. Everything is sad and straightforward here: people get used to passing cars and sooner or later fall under the wheels.

14. Masters of landscape architecture. 18 deaths per 100,000 people per year. It would seem, then what? Roll out lawn rolls for yourself, and plant flowers  But no, cutting tree crowns turned out to be a dangerous occupation, leading to a fall from a height.

13. Construction workers. 18 deaths per 100,000 people per year. Just like a brick: the cause of death is usually a fall from a height or a collision with heavy equipment.

12. Crane operators. Every year, 19 people are killed for every 100,000 people. Surprisingly, crane operators rarely fly from top to bottom on their own. A fall and a tower crane were the primary causes of their deaths. This is frequently caused by strong wind gusts.

11. Regulators. 19 deaths per 100,000 people per year. Like road workers, police officers who work on the road cease to perceive cars as dangerous and lose their vigilance. There are also simply arrivals at the traffic controller standing at the crossroads.

10. Electricians. 20 deaths per 100,000 people per year. The leading cause of death seems banal: an electric shock. Many electricians say they have been hit many times and nothing. Vigilance is dulled, and then suitable physical parameters are superimposed on gouging.

9. Fire inspectors. 20 deaths per 100,000 people per year. Attention: not firefighters, but fire inspectors, that is, people who check the condition of fire safety systems. They often die in traffic accidents, which, ironically, accompany car fires and explosions.

8. Farmers. 26 deaths per 100,000 people per year. Here is an unexpected twist! Cows, lambs, swede-cucumbers – it would seem, what are the dangers? But field workers are waiting for incidents related to agricultural machinery. In particular, accidents on tractors. We had heard something like this before, although we were sure these were stereotypes from jokes.

7. Couriers on cars. 27 deaths per 100,000 people per year. In terms of mortality, road transport is generally far ahead of planes, trains, and ships. And couriers are always in a hurry.

6. High-altitude fitters. 29 deaths per 100,000 people per year. The reason is apparent: the neglect of insurance and, as a result, a high flight with a guaranteed unaesthetic landing.

5. Dustman. the average is 34 deaths per 100,000 people per year. Again, no exotics: no attacks by giant rats, no poisoning with mysterious chemicals. The most common cause of death is a collision with a garbage truck (on the issue of garbage: “Waste legalization: a brief history of garbage from antiquity to the present day”).

4. Roofers. The average is 53 deaths per 100,000 people per year. Everything is transparent and predictable here, although never romantic: slipped, fell, buried. Of course, roofers must carry out high-altitude work with insurance, but the sense of danger is again over timed.

3. Drilling Engineer. The average is 46 deaths per 100,000 people per year. And this is despite the severe penalties for violating safety regulations. It’s just that the units and equipment are too heavy; the pipes fly overhead, plus the danger of gas release and all that.

2. Pilots. The average is 53 deaths per 100,000 people per year. It turns out that we are shamelessly lying about the safety of aviation. Fortunately, no. Most of the deaths occur in private aviation, where the pilot is responsible for the aircraft’s pre-flight inspection and overall condition.

1. And in the first place loggers. The annual average is 111 deaths per 100,000 people. Accidental contact with heavy logging equipment or logs is the leading cause of death. Unfortunately, national specificity works against you here: if you tell a new pretty acquaintance that you work at a logging site, you will be misunderstood.

WATCH THE FULL VIDEO HERE

FAST DOWNLOAD

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*